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Chinese Businessman Uses Panda Poo to Grow Tea

Panda Poo fertilizes tea that will become the most expensive in the world. $200 a cup. It’s not as if you’re drinking panda poo, but supposedly a lot of nutrients get passed through a panda since all they do is eat and sleep. Yes, it reminds you of the coffee, kopi luwak, but this isn’t tea passed though an animals body, it’s merely in the dirt. Imagine… what fertilizer is being used for the tea or coffee that you drink now? (Reuters – Panda Poo)

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Drink Panda Poo Tea

It’s not the actual poo. We thought we’d break that to you, but the nutrients from the panda excrement is being used as fertilizer for a special tea that definitely soaks in the goodness from the panda’s diet. It’s said that panda only digest 30% of what they’re eating, so the excrement is actually filled with nutrients.  An Yanshi, below bought 11 tons of feces from the ass of a panda and is growing this specialty tea. What do panda’s eat? Bamboo! What’s Bamboo associated with? Long Life. It all comes at a price. $35,000 for 18 ounces and might be a hit with someone in China… it’s higher than the high priced Kopi Luwak which are made from coffee beans...

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Panda Census It’s That Time

Panda Census. Time to count, since it’s been a decade. How many are there? Ten years ago, 1,596 pandas were in the wild. Obviously it won’t be perfect, but they’ll get a rough idea. It sounds like an adventure worthy of a TV show. (LA Times – Panda Census)

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In China, You Can Have a “Panda” or a “Tiger” of Your Very Own

At first glance, the animals in the photographs do look like pandas and tigers. On second glance, however, it probably looks suspicious to see a pretty woman walking a panda on a leash, and a tiger with its tongue hanging out and teeth that are way too short. That’s because the pandas are actually chow chow dogs, and the tiger is a golden retriever. Welcome to China, where the latest trend in pet dog ownership amongst the more affluent is to have their pets dyed to look like exotic and endangered animals. It is true that China has had a long history of raising dogs for nutritional and medicinal purposes (it’s still used for those purposes in some parts of...

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