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Boba May Cause Cancer?

What doesn’t these days, but now the latest Asian food scare is boba or “bubble tea”. It may have a carcinogen that shouldn’t be in food at all is what “they” are saying. What took them so long to figure this one out?! For those who are freaked out because you’re slurping up a ball as you read this, who knows… factories which make boba aren’t all equal. This is a single sample from a single place. But you never know. (Huffington Post – Boba)

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Chinese Businessman Uses Panda Poo to Grow Tea

Panda Poo fertilizes tea that will become the most expensive in the world. $200 a cup. It’s not as if you’re drinking panda poo, but supposedly a lot of nutrients get passed through a panda since all they do is eat and sleep. Yes, it reminds you of the coffee, kopi luwak, but this isn’t tea passed though an animals body, it’s merely in the dirt. Imagine… what fertilizer is being used for the tea or coffee that you drink now? (Reuters – Panda Poo)

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Coffee or Tea in China? Java is it.

Coffee in China. Instead of tea crops, coffee is where the money is at. Like all things, when it’s not working you have to change it. Yunnan was once a tea capital, to the point of building shapes, proper names, all worked to make it a tea like atmosphere. Perhaps it was just for good luck or the tiny bits of marketing, but now, it’s becoming a coffee area and growing. The Economist mentions, “A family with a hectare of coffee can earn more than $10,000 a year, triple the amount for tea, and five times more than for maize or rice” It’s growing. We can’t wait to see Yunnan written on a bag of coffee sitting next to Ethiopia...

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For All of the Tea in China, You Have to Go To England

“Nearly a third of our black tea consumption is Earl Grey, and we feel Tregothnan’s is outstanding compared with other brands.” Tea is tea is tea, and for centuries it has been an essential part of both Asian and English cuisine. And as you probably knew, the importation of tea from China and other parts of Asia to England formed one of the very first bonds of trade between the Eastern and Western worlds. Okay, so much for history, which is always evolving anyway and is often filled with irony. Because for one small company in England, the love for tea has led to a mastery in growing, harvesting and processing the precious leaves into a product which is very...

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