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Momo - A Group Exhibition March 3 - March 21st

MOMO NO SEKKU/ 桃の節句(PEACH FESTIVAL)  Exhibition - March 3 - March 21st. Reception 6:30-10pm GIRLS DAY or Hinamatsuri is a day which one of five seasonal milestones on the Japanese calendar. It was established from the Chinese Yin-Yang Five-Line theory.  MOMO/ means peach, and peach blossom stands for longevity, also it was said that peach blossom ward off evil spirits. SEKKU/ SE: means the change of the season. KKU: means festival and offering. It’s a seasonal milestone that wishes a disease-free life, good harvest, prosperity of descendants, and warding off evil.  Stella im Hultberg, Mari Inukai, Audrey Kawasaki, Nicolas Nemiri, Amy Sol, Katsuya Terada, Kent Williams, Yoskay Yamamoto at GR2 Gallery 2062 Sawtelle Blvd LA, CA 90025 Curated by Mari Inukai

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Asian American Film Festival in Chicago

Greetings from Chicago Tim Hugh, one man bandleader of the Chicago Asian American Film Festival This is Tim Hugh and his dog Helga in his kitchen in Chicago. Tim has run the only Asian American Indie Film Fest (i.e. no “imports”) for 12 of the 17 years that it’s been in existence. In this picture, he’s a one man bandleader- running it solo, something I can relate to as a solo musician. I’m in town to promote my film “Daylight Savings” which premiered at SXSW this year, and will be the opening night film this year. Joining me at the screening will be Michael Aki who plays my cousin in the film. I met Mike at this very festival in...

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China Boy & Susie Cotton

Over the years I’ve collected lots of different things. One theme that runs across a lot of my vintage collections is blatant “Oriental” racist images.  I’m always fascinated by the fact that these images used to be totally acceptable as home decor, and when I found these items in thrift stores, antique malls and flea markets I snatched them up. This imagery shaped the future of Asians in America for generations to come. It made the stereotypes that began with the first wave of Asian immigrants in the 1800s acceptable in mainstream culture all the way until… well, even now I suppose. My skin still crawls every time I see Yellow Face cosplay at conventions. This stuff just doesn’t ever...

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The 1980s and the Murakami Phenomenon

The English publication of Haruki Murakami’s novel, 1Q84, is  beyond the horizon and the literary world is abuzz with excitement. As the name suggests, it takes place during 1984, a curious contemporary setting given that this was the same decade where Murakami’s career took flight. As many economic historians know, it’s also a period where Japan’s economic wealth was at its height before their economic bubble burst  and a recession stretched past the turn of the millennium. Writers and historians stress the monetary decadence of the 1980s, but there was more than just productional consumption at play. A closer look into the country’s “consumption of knowledge” reveals a lesser known account of Japan’s “intellectual” trends of the time and where Murakami...

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